Craft Beer, South American Style

Colombia, a country best known for its coffee—and, let’s face it, cocaine production—is not exactly on the tip of most craft beer lover’s tongues. But that may change. Colombian craft beers have been gaining attention not just in their own country, but on the world’s stage.
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Wine Country Brews

We’ve all heard the phrase “It takes a lot of beer to make great wine,” which—and we can say this from years of working winery harvests—is dead on.
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Pints of Fire and Ice

For a country roughly the size of Ohio with a population of 319,000, Iceland packs a big punch in a small package. Iceland only started selling beer with an alcohol content of more than 2.25% in 1989 (the original law prohibited all alcohol in 1915 but from 1935 on only applied to “strong beer”). Big name beers like Gull, Viking and Thule are ubiquitous, but Iceland’s microbrew movement is making strides.
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Home Brew Hotels

Earlier this week we brought you a stellar list of hotels with hops. But sometimes you’re looking for a homier vibe, and that means checking in via new-era vacation home rentals you can book online (often at a great price).
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Rose-Colored Glasses

Hibiscus, the genus of mostly tropical flowering plants used for centuries as a medicine, dye, and tea drink has found its way into beer, making them as rosy as a rosé wine—and sometimes bright as berries. What, you’re not tough enough to tip back a bright pink pint? We all should be. For one, the beers are often deliciously unusual, sometimes blended with other herbs and spices and traditional witbier flavorings like orange peel and coriander. Also consider that hibiscus tea contains bioflavenoids known to slow the buildup of LDL cholesterol. OK, pass the pink!
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Bright, Light, and Belgian

To the novice, Belgian beers are thought to be by turns “heavy” or “rich” and “full-bodied”, but such descriptors believe the fact that Belgium’s beer tradition—in addition to many a very big brew—includes super-refreshing, lighter styles, too. Miguel Silva, Beverage Director of Villains Chicago, a soon-to-be-opened craft-focused beer bar in the Windy City’s Printer’s Row area with 40 handles and deep bottle list, got into these full-flavored brews (among others) in the 1990s, exploring the famous lists at places like The Map Room. Ditching his career as a mortgage lender in June 2007, he was soon working in craft beer around the clock and taking trips into Michigan’s brewery- and beer bar-dotted Upper Peninsula. Smart moves.
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Fire and Spice

Craft beers have been taking a bath in Kentucky’s finest barrels. The results, in the right brewers’ hands, can be delicious. Americans have enjoyed bourbon for centuries, but it wasn’t until the 1990s that craft breweries began tinkering with bourbon-soaked barrels. The brewmasters at Samuel Adams and Goose Island, for example, discovered they could impart their favorite bourbon flavors – vanilla, caramel and even dried stone fruits like cherry – into beer by letting it mellow in the charred oak barrels formerly used for bourbon. Over the last three decades their experiments have helped fuel one of the hottest, if polarizing, trends in brewing (and a tasty way to recycle). It’s fascinating to experience how a humble bourbon barrel can transform the flavor and aroma of a good craft beer—provided those powerful flavors don’t completely overwhelm the beer.
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Take These Six Pils and Call Us in the Morning

“Pilsner” has an old-school ring to it, but thanks to a raft of modern craft brew reinterpretations, this classic beer style—perfected across what is now Germany and the Czech Republic in the 19th century—is as fresh and vibrant as ever. What you need to know is that pilsner, technically a lager (or cold-fermented) beer, tends to be pale straw to golden in color and clear as Cuervo gold. Depending on regional, historically inspired style variations, it’s about 5%abv, bready, biscuity, and dry, with spicy hop overtones, and a fulsome, but not-too-heavy mouth feel and lively carbonation. It’s generally filtered to complete clarity, but there are hazy, unfiltered versions you couldn’t pry out of our hands. If you want to drink the world’s most famous historically important brands, reach no further than Pilsner Urquell, Budvar, or Mahr’s, preferably fresh on draft.
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Cities of Gold

It's high summer, and that means one thing: beer. There are over 2,800 breweries in the United States. That makes it hard to know where to begin when planning a beer-based adventure. So we picked five sure fire starters.
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Tasmanian Revel

Tasmania, an Australian island located approximately 150 miles south of the mainland, is probably most famous for its unofficial animal, the Tasmanian devil (which looks nothing like the Warner Bros. cartoon). The 26th largest island in the world, Tasmania is home to about half a million people, with 6.4 million acres of land reserved in parks and forests, and quite a few wallabies. Recently, though, Tasmania is becoming known for its booze, cider and craft beer.
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